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The Life And Adventures Of Santa Claus by L. Frank Baum (illus. by Shanower)

An interesting origin story for Santa Claus, though a bit vapid by modern standards. Pretty art, tho'.

Told Under The Christmas Tree, compiled by Frances Cavanah

A perfectly nice 1940s collection of Christmas tales, some religious, some fantastical, some historical.

By Spaceship To The Moon by Jack Coggins and Fletcher Pratt

As mentioned elsewhere, my elementary school had a copy of this (pre-Sputnik) book in its library, and I must have checked it out a half-dozen times. The science holds up pretty well, though the assumption that we would build a space station before attempting the moon didn't come true. The art is marvelous (Google it!). Space travel art that is not intended to be fantastic, but also was created before actual space travel, is a small niche, and it's wonderfully one step to the right of the reality. (See also Chesley Bonestell.)

Weirdworld: Warriors Of The Shadow Realm by Doug Moench et al

Created to cash in on the Tolkien craze, this Marvel comic is an amiable fantasy about two naive elves and their grumpy dwarf friend dealing with assorted crises in Weirdworld. Marvel did not stint on the production values here; several of these stories came out in special editions including copious notes, text features, and maps. Nevertheless, it's all a bit silly, what with islands shaped like skulls and such.

Mister X: The Archives by Dean Motter et al

I bought the original Mister X collection back in the 80s, which included just the first four issues. I always thought it was a delight. This collection includes the following ten issues as well, in which things get increasingly incoherent to no obvious purpose but disorientation. If they're attempting to make the reader feel like one of the citizens of Radiant City, with its mind-altering architecture, well, have at, but I didn't enjoy it as much as the original story.

Grass by Sheri S. Tepper

I heard many good things about this novel. I understand why it gets the praise it does. Nevertheless, I don't think it's my sort of book. I made it halfway through before I admitted that I wasn't enjoying it enough to finish it. So, I skipped ahead, read the last two chapters, and I'm calling it done. Good book, but not for me.

Homing Nostalgia Missile

Jun. 13th, 2017 06:24 am
woodwardiocom: (Default)
[personal profile] woodwardiocom
When I was in grade school back in the 70s, the school library had a pre-Sputnik nonfiction book on space travel. I borrowed it several times, and the pictures engraved themselves in my brain, as such things do.

For decades, I've been idly trying to track down the book, which is tricky, given I didn't remember the title. It wasn't The Conquest Of Space or The Complete Book Of Space. Finally, I followed the right nostalgia-Tumblr, saw a familiar image, Googled it, got a name, and ordered a used copy off of Amazon: By Space Ship To The Moon by Jack Coggins and Fletcher Pratt. Oh yeah, that's the stuff...

August 2015

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