gnomi: (boston_skyline (shoegal-icons))
So, it's that time of year, when the students return (like swallows to Capistrano) to Boston. And thus it is time for yet another "[livejournal.com profile] gnomi explains it all" post. Not that any of the people this post is directed toward will actually see it, but it'll make me feel better.

1. You see that thing in front of you? It's a Really Big Street. Running across it while those fast-moving things (we call them "cars") are barrelling down at you will hurt you more than it will hurt the cars.

2. Moving trucks, while useful, should not completely block any of the following: driveways, sidewalks, crosswalks, intersections. We know you have to move your stuff. However, some of us have to live here, too.

3. Speaking of crosswalks, please learn how to use them. No, really. They're not there purely for the amusement of line painters.

4. Ah, the T. Yes, it's a subway system. Yes, it gets you and your obnoxious friends from place to place. But it is not solely yours. The other commuters might want to be able to, say, read their newspapers free of your loud, obscene comments at 7:15 in the morning. Or even at 5:30 at night.

5. Also, you see those big signs in the T stations that say "There is no smoking permitted on MBTA property?" Those do apply to you. And they apply regardless of what you're choosing to smoke. I'm just saying.

6. We know you're eager to get on the train. But you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends are just making it harder for everyone if you're blocking the door, keeping those of us in the train from getting out. This also applies to people blocking the doors when inside the train; if you move out of the doorway, people will be able to get off the train and you will get to your destination faster.

7. While we're talking trains and etiquette, let's tackle getting to and from those trains. You see the escalator? It comfortably accommodates two people per stair. But here's the deal. Stay to the right if you want to stand and let the moving stairs propel you upwards. Stay to the left if you wish to walk up the stairs. This is established local tradition, and there's no need for the commuters to have to slalom purely because you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends can't be bothered to notice all the people standing to the right of the stairs.

8. Bicycles are great. We're all for them. In fact, we have bike lanes on some of our major streets. Please, however, pay attention to the following important fact: Bicycles are subject to the same laws as the cars if you're riding on the street (which, for the most part, you should be; many municipalities have laws against riding on sidewalks). This means that you have to stop when the light is red and allow the pedestrians to walk. This does not mean that you should barrel through the crosswalk and curse out the pedestrians who have the gumption to get into the crosswalk when you want to be there (despite the fact that they, not you, have the light).

So, welcome to Boston. Keeping these things in mind will make your life much simpler and will also prevent me from thwacking you with my elbow as I strive to get to or from work.

Thank you,
The management.

*Or, whenever I remember to post it or am reminded to post it.
gnomi: (boston_skyline (shoegal-icons))
So, it's that time of year, when the students return (like swallows to Capistrano) to Boston. And thus it is time for yet another "[personal profile] gnomi explains it all" post. Not that any of the people this post is directed toward will actually see it, but it'll make me feel better.

1. You see that thing in front of you? It's a Really Big Street. Running across it while those fast-moving things (we call them "cars") are barrelling down at you will hurt you more than it will hurt the cars.

2. Moving trucks, while useful, should not completely block any of the following: driveways, sidewalks, crosswalks, intersections. We know you have to move your stuff. However, some of us have to live here, too.

3. Speaking of crosswalks, please learn how to use them. No, really. They're not there purely for the amusement of line painters.

4. Ah, the T. Yes, it's a subway system. Yes, it gets you and your obnoxious friends from place to place. But it is not solely yours. The other commuters might want to be able to, say, read their newspapers free of your loud, obscene comments at 7:15 in the morning. Or even at 5:30 at night.

5. Also, you see those big signs in the T stations that say "There is no smoking permitted on MBTA property?" Those do apply to you. And they apply regardless of what you're choosing to smoke. I'm just saying.

6. We know you're eager to get on the train. But you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends are just making it harder for everyone if you're blocking the door, keeping those of us in the train from getting out. This also applies to people blocking the doors when inside the train; if you move out of the doorway, people will be able to get off the train and you will get to your destination faster.

7. While we're talking trains and etiquette, let's tackle getting to and from those trains. You see the escalator? It comfortably accommodates two people per stair. But here's the deal. Stay to the right if you want to stand and let the moving stairs propel you upwards. Stay to the left if you wish to walk up the stairs. This is established local tradition, and there's no need for the commuters to have to slalom purely because you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends can't be bothered to notice all the people standing to the right of the stairs.

8. Bicycles are great. We're all for them. In fact, we have bike lanes on some of our major streets. Please, however, pay attention to the following important fact: Bicycles are subject to the same laws as the cars if you're riding on the street (which, for the most part, you should be; many municipalities have laws against riding on sidewalks). This means that you have to stop when the light is red and allow the pedestrians to walk. This does not mean that you should barrel through the crosswalk and curse out the pedestrians who have the gumption to get into the crosswalk when you want to be there (despite the fact that they, not you, have the light).

So, welcome to Boston. Keeping these things in mind will make your life much simpler and will also prevent me from thwacking you with my elbow as I strive to get to or from work.

Thank you,
The management.
gnomi: (knit_poke_eyes (shoegal-icons))
(and it's not even Festivus)

I'll start:

Center-pull balls that don't. I shouldn't have to stop in the middle of my sock to untangle the gob of yarn that just spewed forth.

Grrrr!
gnomi: (transportation_local)
I know the bus is crowded. I know the design of the newish buses makes it harder for everyone. But you need to be aware of your surroundings. Repeatedly hitting me in the head with the newspaper you're flailing around with while you talk (loudly) to your boyfriend on your cellphone is not a way to make friends. Further, when I turn around to look at you, saying (again loudly) into your phone, "Oh, now some lady I *accidentally* hit in the head is giving me a death glare" is not an appropriate response. A better response would be, "I'm sorry." Also, telling the guy you're on the phone with that the people around you on the bus are getting ready to kill you because you're *blocking the path* to the door at *every* stop is not going to win you any points.

Please be aware that you do not own the bus, you are not the only passenger, and none of us really want to hear that you feel your dad is treating you like you're a crack dealer because instead of giving you cash he gave you $50 in gift cards to Stop & Shop.

Thank you.

--That chick who, in fact, could hear you over the podcast she was listening to.
gnomi: (crankiness)
That space left because no cars are currently parked along the side of the road and the bus is about 6 feet away from the curb is not a lane. It's a bus stop. Someone might expect to be able to step off the bus without almost getting hit by a car. Really. Ask anyone.

Here's your homework: look up "driving to endanger."

No love, and I hope some cop pulls you over before you hit someone,

--That chick you almost hit at the corner of Harvard and Coolidge Streets

P.S. You, that idiot who followed the @$$*#, same goes for you.

Yes, I'm physically fine, just shaken.
gnomi: (gone_to_dark_side (shoegal-icons))
Here's the scenario: you go into a store and pick an item off a rack. The rack has a large sign that says "Sale: $29.99." In small print, the sign says "For items orignally marked $50." None of the items on the rack have an original price of $50. In fact, all of them are original price $80, and at the register they come up at a price of $49.99.

So... should you be paying $29.99 or $49.99?
gnomi: (pet_peeve (shoegal-icons))
-- Overarching Rosh Hashanna menu goal: Avoid the Butcherie if at all possible. Alas, I failed in this goal, since Stop & Shop was out of shredded mozzerella cheese, but [personal profile] mabfan and I went to Butcherie at 6:45 this morning and got in and out within 5 or so minutes, so not so bad.

-- As I first mentioned in a comment in [personal profile] cbpotts' journal, baseball is that sport in which the players have a pH greater than 7.

-- If you have a birthday 13-15 September, fear not; you are not forgotten. I will be catching up with greetings after Shabbat.

-- A mini-rant: The weirdest things knock me out of stories. I'm a pedant about the placement of AD in dates (though I tend to use BCE/CE rather than BC/AD). So when I read a story where consistently the dates are written, for example, as 17 September 1997 AD (rather than 17 September AD 1997), it makes me twitch every single time. BC, BCE, and CE all go *after* the year, so I can see where the confusion comes from. But still. Every single time.

-- When my knitting-geek-ness and SF-geek-ness collide: I'm currently knitting this. Extermiknit!
gnomi: (boston_skyline (shoegal-icons))
So, it's that time of year, when the students return (like swallows to Capistrano) to Boston. And thus it is time for yet another "[personal profile] gnomi explains it all" post. Not that any of the people this post is directed toward will actually see it, but it'll make me feel better.

1. You see that thing in front of you? It's a Really Big Street. Running across it while those fast-moving things (we call them "cars") are barrelling down at you will hurt you more than it will hurt the cars.

2. Moving trucks, while useful, should not completely block any of the following: driveways, sidewalks, crosswalks, intersections. We know you have to move your stuff. However, some of us have to live here, too.

3. Speaking of crosswalks, please learn how to use them. No, really. They're not there purely for the amusement of line painters.

4. Ah, the T. Yes, it's a subway system. Yes, it gets you and your obnoxious friends from place to place. But it is not solely yours. The other commuters might want to be able to, say, read their newspapers free of your loud, obscene comments at 7:15 in the morning. Or even at 5:30 at night.

5. Also, you see those big signs in the T stations that say "There is no smoking permitted on MBTA property?" Those do apply to you. And they apply regardless of what you're choosing to smoke. I'm just saying.

6. We know you're eager to get on the train. But you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends are just making it harder for everyone if you're blocking the door, keeping those of us in the train from getting out. This also applies to people blocking the doors when inside the train; if you move out of the doorway, people will be able to get off the train and you will get to your destination faster.

7. While we're talking trains and etiquette, let's tackle getting to and from those trains. You see the escalator? It comfortably accommodates two people per stair. But here's the deal. Stay to the right if you want to stand and let the moving stairs propel you upwards. Stay to the left if you wish to walk up the stairs. This is established local tradition, and there's no need for the commuters to have to slalom purely because you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends can't be bothered to notice all the people standing to the right of the stairs.

So, welcome to Boston. Keeping these things in mind will make your life much simpler and will also prevent me from thwacking you with my elbow as I strive to get to or from work.

Thank you,
The management.
gnomi: (Default)
Yesterday, [personal profile] mabfan had a medical procedure in the morning, and then he and I went home for him to recuperate. We got home at about 1:00 PM, had lunch, and then I set about doing random Stuff while he rested and worked on healing.

At about 2:45, the buzzer rang. I went down the three flights of stairs to the front door to see who it was (we weren’t expecting anyone, but we didn’t know if perhaps a package was being delivered). It was a perky-grinned, earnest young woman wearing a MASSPIRG jacket. “Good afternoon,” she started. “I’m sorry,” I said. “My husband just had surgery this morning; I don’t really have time to talk to you today.” She apologized and left the building and I headed back upstairs. We heard the buzzer in the apartment below ours buzzing as I got back into our apartment, so I figured that MASSPIRG Chick had decided to come back into the building and try her luck with some of our neighbors.

The afternoon progressed, I got more Stuff done, and then at about 6:15, the buzzer rang again. I sighed and headed back downstairs. Again, we weren’t expecting anyone, but since our building intercom doesn’t work properly, there was no way for me to determine if it was someone who we wanted to see or not without going back downstairs. To my surprise, who was at the door but the same MASSPIRG Chick. She greeted me with the same perky grin she’d had the first time until I got the door open. She then realized who I was. “I thought I told you I didn’t have time to talk to you today,” I said. “I didn’t mean to buzz you again,” she replied. Of course, she’d already buzzed folks in the building earlier, so she’d come back to harass someone again. “You’ve just guaranteed that I won’t be giving money to MASSPIRG this year,” I said. “I’m sorry,” she said, and then she turned and left the building again. I didn’t see her come back this time, nor did I hear her buzz anyone else in the building, so I do believe she left for good.

An overreaction on my part? Perhaps. But once you’ve been told that a person you’re trying to solicit money from is not interested, it’s in your best interest to make a note on your sheet so you don’t bother them again within a four-hour period.
gnomi: (crankiness)
OK, so... I'll buy that the character signs. Really, he has so many language skills, it wouldn't surprise me to find that he knows sign. However -- and this is the kicker -- he'd know American Sign Language. Not British Sign Language. I can get past the BrE spellings (kind of). I can get past (somewhat) the BrE phrases in the mouths secondary characters (even if they're not specifically identified as being from the UK). But... Ms. Writer Person, you're really pushing it when you put British Sign in the hands of an American character.

Grrrrr.
gnomi: (grammar_crisis_room (wanderingbastet ))
In regards the use and misuse of certain words:

To lie: intransitive verb. Does not take an object.

Today I lie.

Yesterday I lay.

I have lain.



To lay: transitive verb. Takes an object.

Today the chicken lays an egg.

Yesterday the chicken laid an egg.

The chicken has laid many eggs.



Please make a note of it.
gnomi: (transportation_local)
So, it's that time of year, when the students return (like swallows to Capistrano) to Boston. And thus it is time for yet another "[personal profile] gnomi explains it all" post. Not that any of the people this post is directed toward will actually see it, but it'll make me feel better.

1. You see that thing in front of you? It's a Really Big Street. Running across it while those fast-moving things (we call them "cars") are barrelling down at you will hurt you more than it will hurt the cars.

2. Moving trucks, while useful, should not completely block any of the following: driveways, sidewalks, crosswalks, intersections. We know you have to move your stuff. However, some of us have to live here, too.

3. Speaking of crosswalks, please learn how to use them. No, really. They're not there purely for the amusement of line painters.

4. Ah, the T. Yes, it's a subway system. Yes, it gets you and your obnoxious friends from place to place. But it is not solely yours. The other commuters might want to be able to, say, read their newspapers free of your loud, obscene comments at 7:15 in the morning. Or even at 5:30 at night.

5. Also, you see those big signs in the T stations that say "There is no smoking permitted on MBTA property?" Those do apply to you. And they apply regardless of what you're choosing to smoke. I'm just saying.

6. We know you're eager to get on the train. But you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends are just making it harder for everyone if you're blocking the door, keeping those of us in the train from getting out. This also applies to people blocking the doors when inside the train; if you move out of the doorway, people will be able to get off the train and you will get to your destination faster.

7. While we're talking trains and etiquette, let's tackle getting to and from those trains. You see the escalator? It comfortably accommodates two people per stair. But here's the deal. Stay to the right if you want to stand and let the moving stairs propel you upwards. Stay to the left if you wish to walk up the stairs. This is established local tradition, and there's no need for the commuters to have to slalom purely because you and your aforementioned obnoxious friends can't be bothered to notice all the people standing to the right of the stairs.

So, welcome to Boston. Keeping these things in mind will make your life much simpler and will also prevent me from thwacking you with my elbow as I strive to get to or from work.

Thank you,
The management.
gnomi: (p_h)
I am here to speak out in protection of the word "fulsome."

The American Heritage Dictionary (4th edition, 2001) defines fulsome as:

adj.Offensively flattering or insincere. See Syns. at unctuous. [ME fulsom, abundant, disgusting]


However, I keep seeing it used as a synonym for "abundant," presumably based on false association with "full." And it is time to stand up for fulsome in its original meaning. Thus, no more fulsome praise...unless you really mean that the praise is offensive or insincere.

I, and my fellow vocabulary pedants, thank you.
gnomi: (thinker)
So, please tell me: Why is it that the MPAA has no problem giving PG and PG-13 ratings to movies with huge amounts of violence, but show a naked butt and you get at minimum a PG-13 and more likely an R? Add in the spectre of homosexual overtones, and you're going to get a special warning on your TV episode. Feh.

I'm told - and from what I've seen via BBC TV, I'd buy it - that in the UK it's the opposite. Sexual situations are much less "taboo" than violence and they are much more likely to allow sexual situations (and what are considered "taboo" words) on the airwaves than scenes of explicit violence.

So what is the message we're trying to give here? Tommy is welcome to hit Bobby and blow up his house using a shoulder-mounted missile launcher, but heaven forfend he consider hugging Bobby instead and it becomes a Very Special Episode.

I just don't get it.

(I've been pondering this for a while; [personal profile] rikibeth encouraged me to write something up about it)

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